Jesus when He wasn't so nice...and what it can teach us.

When you think of Jesus, what image pops in to your head? Many get images of Jesus painted as a shepherd holding a lamb across his shoulders, or talking to children, or many other things beside. We have a tendency to think of the tender and mild side of Jesus...but there are times in the Gospel when Jesus was actually quite harsh. He flipped tables over (twice), He pronounced woes on the Pharisees, Sadducees, Jerusalem, and the current generation He was in, and He did not excuse the persecution of those considered by the religious "Sinners." As I read scripture, I realize that there are times when it would be uncomfortable to be around Jesus! Below, I'll put a section of Scripture, and you'll see what I mean, but before I do, I want to challenge all of us: what does this mean for us? Why Did Jesus Do it? Considering Jesus' Mission: To spread the news of the Kingdom, and to bring the lost home, can we see that Jesus cared so much that even in his (righteous) anger, Jesus was seeking to challenge people to turn their hearts around? In the modern church, especially here in the US, we've cheapened and watered down the word of God. We've tried to make it "Accessible" but at the same time, we've watered down the word so that people think they can have Jesus without repentance. The thing is, you can't. I'll end my devotional with a quote from Dietrich Bonhoeffer who said it better than I ever could:

“Cheap grace means grace sold on the market like cheapjacks' wares. The sacraments, the forgiveness of sin, and the consolations of religion are thrown away at cut prices. Grace is represented as the Church's inexhaustible treasury, from which she showers blessings with generous hands, without asking questions or fixing limits. Grace without price; grace without cost! The essence of grace, we suppose, is that the account has been paid in advance; and, because it has been paid, everything can be had for nothing. Since the cost was infinite, the possibilities of using and spending it are infinite. What would grace be if it were not cheap?... Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession, absolution without personal confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate. Costly grace is the treasure hidden in the field; for the sake of it a man will go and sell all that he has. It is the pearl of great price to buy which the merchant will sell all his goods. It is the kingly rule of Christ, for whose sake a man will pluck out the eye which causes him to stumble; it is the call of Jesus Christ at which the disciple leaves his nets and follows him. Costly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again, the gift which must be asked for, the door at which a man must knock. Such grace is costly because it calls us to follow, and it is grace because it calls us to follow Jesus Christ. It is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life. It is costly because it condemns sin, and grace because it justifies the sinner. Above all, it is costly because it cost God the life of his Son: "ye were bought at a price," and what has cost God much cannot be cheap for us. Above all, it is grace because God did not reckon his Son too dear a price to pay for our life, but delivered him up for us. Costly grace is the Incarnation of God.”

Matthew 11 English Standard Version (ESV)


Messengers from John the Baptist


11 When Jesus had finished instructing his twelve disciples, he went on from there to teach and preach in their cities.


Now when John heard in prison about the deeds of the Christ, he sent word by his disciples and said to him, “Are you the one who is to come, or shall we look for another?” And Jesus answered them, “Go and tell John what you hear and see: the blind receive their sight and the lame walk, lepers[a] are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, and the poor have good news preached to them. And blessed is the one who is not offended by me.”


As they went away, Jesus began to speak to the crowds concerning John: “What did you go out into the wilderness to see? A reed shaken by the wind? What then did you go out to see? A man[b] dressed in soft clothing? Behold, those who wear soft clothing are in kings' houses.What then did you go out to see? A prophet?[c] Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet. 10 This is he of whom it is written,


“‘Behold, I send my messenger before your face, who will prepare your way before you.’


11 Truly, I say to you, among those born of women there has arisen no one greater than John the Baptist. Yet the one who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he. 12 From the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of heaven has suffered violence,[d] and the violent take it by force. 13 For all the Prophets and the Law prophesied until John, 14 and if you are willing to accept it, he is Elijah who is to come. 15 He who has ears to hear,[e] let him hear.


16 “But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the marketplaces and calling to their playmates,


17 “‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we sang a dirge, and you did not mourn.’


18 For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.’ 19 The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Look at him! A glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’ Yet wisdom is justified by her deeds.”[f]


Woe to Unrepentant Cities


20 Then he began to denounce the cities where most of his mighty works had been done, because they did not repent. 21 “Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. 22 But I tell you, it will be more bearable on the day of judgment for Tyre and Sidon than for you. 23 And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You will be brought down to Hades. For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. 24 But I tell you that it will be more tolerable on the day of judgment for the land of Sodom than for you.”


Come to Me, and I Will Give You Rest


25 At that time Jesus declared, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; 26 yes, Father, for such was your gracious will.[g] 27 All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him. 28 Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”


Footnotes:

a. Matthew 11:5 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13

b. Matthew 11:8 Or Why then did you go out? To see a man…

c. Matthew 11:9 Some manuscripts Why then did you go out? To see a prophet?

d. Matthew 11:12 Or has been coming violently

e. Matthew 11:15 Some manuscripts omit to hear

f. Matthew 11:19 Some manuscripts children (compare Luke 7:35)

g. Matthew 11:26 Or for so it pleased you well



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